updated January 2019

Looking for Health Information Online: How do we how who to trust?
https://tinyurl.com/yb968bvl (guidance from University Hospital Aintree)

  • NHS - Information on conditions, treatments, local services and healthy living.
  • Cochrane Library - a collection of high-quality, independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making.
  • NICE (The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) - provides guidelines for the NHS
  • Healthwatch England - The national consumer champion in health and care.
  • Patient Information Forum - Campaigns to ensure that health information is central to high quality, patient-centred care.
  • Patient UK - Provides non-medical people in UK with information on health and diseases.
  • Healthline.com - provides trusted health information, free tools, news and doctor-reviewed resources.
  • NICE Evidence - aimed at NHS staff but still useful for in-depth information

Getting you back into employment: the Directions Project at The Brain Charity

Employment and neurological conditions

The impact of being diagnosed with a neurological condition can be devastating, and often means so much more than losing your health.

You may also have lost your independence or job too, and found you are no longer able to work as you previously did.

This can have a huge impact on self-esteem and make you feel you have nothing to contribute to society.

But help is out there, and The Brain Charity can assist you with taking the first steps back on the pathway to education, training or employment. 

What is The Directions Project?

While discrimination and a lack of skills, experience and opportunity may be holding you back from getting a job, we find low confidence is the major barrier our service users face when re-entering the workplace.

This is what we aim to address first, through the Directions Project.

The Directions Project was launched to support more than 2,000 unemployed people in the Liverpool City Region build confidence, develop skills and explore pathways to employment.

What help does the Directions Project provide?

Through the Directions Project, we will give you back the confidence you need to come to terms with your change in employment situation and forge a new path.

Directions will be the springboard from which you can achieve the goals we know you are capable of. You will be able to set your own pace without any pressure.

We can improve your confidence and self-esteem by linking you to a variety of different types of practical and emotional support, available both within our organisation and through partners.

Through The Directions Project:

  • Flexible individual support and personal mentoring to help you access volunteering, work experience or employment opportunities in a suitable working environment for you

Through The Brain Charity’s other services:

  • Free, in-house one-to-one counselling to address any specific emotional or psychological barriers like anxiety, PTSD or lack of self-belief
  • Advice on rights, reasonable adjustments, health expectations, pain management needs and fatigue issues in the workplace for when you are ready to return to work
  • Benefits advice and advocacy for people balancing employment with a caring role

Through our partners:

  • Pathways to training and education if you want to retrain in a new type of work
  • Access to adult education courses in subjects like literacy and maths
  • Practical support with CVs, job applications and interviews
  • Help with business plans, marketing strategies and publicity for clients who would like to become self-employed

Who is eligible for the Directions Project?

To be eligible to take part, you must be:

  • Living in the Liverpool City Region (Liverpool, Knowsley, St Helens, Sefton, Wirral or Halton)
  • Currently receiving a form of unemployment benefit
  • Aged 18 to 65
  • Have evidence of your economic status
  • Have evidence of your right to live and work in the UK, e.g. a current passport, birth certificate, national insurance number, residency permit or marriage certificate

How do you take part in the Directions Project?

Sign up to the Directions Project

Please enter your details below, and project coordinator Diane Richardson will be in touch. Alternatively, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 0151 298 2999. If you would also like to receive general news and updates about The Brain Charity, please tick the box below.

More information

The Directions Project is a partnership of 15 different Merseyside organisations, including The Brain Charity.

It has been part-funded by the European Social Fund, which was established by the European Union to help local areas stimulate economic development.

For more information visit www.gov.uk/european-growth-funding

European Social Fund logosm

There are lots of different causes for headaches. They can be caused by problems such as stress, colds, eye strain, or side-effects of medication.

But sometimes headaches can be a symptom of a neurological problem. Some neurological conditions may have symptoms of chronic, persistent or severe headaches - these include Cluster Headaches and Migraine, Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (SAH), and head injury.

If you keep having problems with headaches you should get in touch with your doctor.

More information

The A.B.C. of Headache Our library in Liverpool has many information resources on pain, and on conditions which cause headache and pain. This includes a copy of the bookThe ABC of Headache edited by Anne MacGregor and Alison Frith. 

The Carer's Handbook: Essential Information and Support for All Those in a Caring Role

ENTWINE Informal Care Online survey on informal care (October 2020)

A carer looks after a loved one who needs help with daily living. They don't do this as a paid job. It is important to remember that carers have rights too, including young carers. These pages list links to where you can get lots of information and advice:

The Brain Charity delivers the Carers Advocacy service for residents who live within the boundaries of Liverpool City Council. By the way, Liverpool CVS has a free interactive online parenting guides for Liverpool residents.

Supported By B.B.C. Children in NeedThe Brain Changer Arts Project

Thanks to generous funding from BBC Children in Need, The Brain Charity is providing dance and art workshops for children and young people, with Physiotherapy Through Dance and Occupational Therapy Through Art.

To find out more or suggest a child who might benefit from The Brain Changer Arts Project, fill out the form below and we'll be in touch.

If you would like to also receive general updates about the work The Brain Charity does, tick ' please send me everything'.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coronavirus: Liverpool Adult Learning Service have paused all of their classes at the Charity for the time being. Thus includes our English, Maths, Creative Writing, Photography and Computer Classes.

I.T. skills course

Find out about using the World-Wide Web, email, Microsoft Office, 'apps', 'tablets', and how to access free online services in 'the Cloud'.

This weekly course is free if you're on benefits. Check our events diary for dates and times.

Those who already have some computer skills can come and learn about new developments in I.T. and refresh their skills.

If you would like to attend this group please let us know by calling us on 0151 298 2999 or by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Provided by Liverpool City Council Adult Learning Services

At The Brain Charity's library

Visitors reading books on library landingCoronavirus: Our library is currently closed to the public. But you can still contact us for advice, and we can still send you some information if you use the contact details below •

Our national enquiry service offers information and advice on any aspect of living with a neurological condition.

If you want to know more about a neurological condition, if you are looking for support groups in your area, or need advice on any aspect of living with a condition, then contact our Information and Advice Team. Our information and advice team are experienced in dealing with a wide range of enquiries and are available to provide you with information that will assist you to understand the practicalities of living with, or supporting somebody with a neurological condition.

Library and Information Centre

The library at our national centre in Liverpool holds a huge range of books, leaflets and other items on hundreds of different neurological conditions and specialist, up to date information. We have information on many rare conditions.  And you can look at our library's catalogue on the web - the catalogue is free for anyone to look at.

As a result of a grant from North West Housing Services, we have been able to purchase books as part of the Reading Agency’s Reading Well scheme for people with long-term conditions. 

These are books recommended by health professionals and by people with long term conditions, and include titles such as Rebuilding Your Life after Stroke and Mindfulness for Health, and titles for carers such as The Carer's Handbook and The Selfish Pig’s Guide to Caring. 

We can provide information in alternative formats on request.

  • Coronaavirus: Our library is currently closed to the public. But you can still contact us for advice, and we can still send you some information if you use the contact details below
  • Telephone – 0151 298 2999
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

At The Walton Centre

If you are visiting The Walton Centre as an outpatient or if you are staying there for treatment, we have staff on-site who can offer you practical help, information and emotional support.

Other information and advice services

We have also put together some useful links to websites which have information on a wide range of neurological information and general health topics, plus medical search engines, and self-help organisations. Plus The Brain Charity can point you to specialist legal advice.

reading well ss

Proud to be a PIF member. Patient Information   Matrix quality standard for information advice and guidance services. Approved by the Guidance Accreditation Board

  • Motivation, willingness and enthusiasm are often the most important qualities that a potential employer looks for in a candidate; studies have shown that a majority of businesses would be more interested in hiring someone who exhibited these qualities rather than someone who did not demonstrate them but possessed more skills.
  • Make sure you research the employer as thoroughly as possible. Company websites are your friend here: familiarise yourself with the business’ history, its values and its aims.
  • On the day of your interview it is important to be smart and punctual.
  • You may want to apply for a Disabled Person’s bus pass to ensure you are able to get to the interview easily and on time.
  • An employer is not normally allowed to ask questions related to your health and disability before they offer you a position.
  • You are under no obligation to disclose your disability during the interview process.
  • According to the 2010 Equality Act, it is illegal for an employer to discriminate against a candidate on the basis of their disability.
  • Prepare for the job interview beforehand. You may want to rehearse some key phrases.
  • During the interview, you will want to be confident and polite: speak clearly, make eye contact with your interviewer. They will likely be impressed if you ask questions about the job or the company, since it demonstrates a genuine interest. When the interview is over, offer them a handshake and thank them for their time.
  • Common job interview questions include:
    “Why did you apply for this role?”
    “Tell me about your strengths and weaknesses.”
    “Can you give us an example of when you demonstrated [a particular desired skill]?
    It is important to be as prepared as possible for any questions the interviewer might ask you, but don’t let yourself be thrown by anything unexpected, and don’t be afraid to ask for clarification if you don’t fully understand a question.
  • Questions you could ask at the end include:
    “How is staff performance measured and evaluated?”
    “What kinds of training could I expect to receive as an employee?”
    “What development opportunities are there within the company?”
  • If you are unsuccessful, it can be useful to ask the employer to provide you with feedback. This will help you to review what went well and what didn’t, so you can be even more prepared for the next opportunity.
    Don’t let yourself get disheartened!

Visitors reading books on library landingCoronavirus: Our library is currently closed to the public. But you can still contact us for advice, and we can still send you some information if you use the contact details below •

Our Library and Information Centre provides information to anyone with a neurological condition, their family, friends, health and social care professionals.

We have an extensive library of resources on a wide range of neurological conditions, patient information, information for carers, as well as information raising awareness for health & social care professionals. Items available in the library include books, reports, newsletters, DVD's, autobiographies, journals and magazines, as well as material produced by organisations which support people with specific neurological conditions.

  • You can see what's in our library and information centre by looking at our online catalogue - you don't need a password or anything, anyone can have a look.

We also have a collection of materials covering the various issues and aspects of living with a neurological conditions such as accessing welfare benefits, managing physical pain, finding the right mobility aids, holidays, insurance and getting the health and social care support you need.

No charge is made, nor membership required, for you to use our library. Some of our stock is for reference-only - however, there is a large amount of materials which can be taken away free of charge.

We can make information available in alternative formats on request.

There is free wi-fi and access to the Internet. We also have two public access computers. Information is also available on our website.

Lots of information is now available on the Internet. If you are not confident with computers or IT – our team can help you to access the information that you need.

Photocopying facilities are available for a small charge.

Contact us

  • Coronavirus: Our library is currently closed to the public. But you can still contact us for advice, and we can still send you some information if you use the contact details below
  • Telephone – 0151 298 2999
  • Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 


Supported by: Northwest Housing Services

Coronavirus: Liverpool Adult Learning Service have paused all of their classes at the Charity for the time being. Thus includes our English, Maths, Creative Writing, Photography and Computer Classes.

Everyday mathsWould you like to improve your maths skills? Maybe you need to re-learn, or learning maths at school was difficult for you, or perhaps you want to learn more and build on the skills you already have? Whatever the reason, we’re here to help. We run a course that is tailored to your individual needs and run at a pace that suits you so that you can achieve the results you want.

All teaching takes place in a relaxed and calm environment with the emphasis on individual learning - you don’t need to worry about comparing yourself to your other classmates or putting your hand up to answer a question, it's all about what works best for you, and our teachers have lots of experience in teaching those who find maths a difficult subject.

The course aims to provide you with an Entry Level to Level 2 Certificate in Maths which gives you relevant mathematical skills that you can use in your day-to-day life. The course is suitable for all ages, and is run by the Liverpool Adult Learning Service - anyone is welcome to come along. The class takes place on a Friday, 9.30-12.00. It's very popular though, so you will need to book a place by calling 0151 298 2999.

Liverpool Adult Learning Service

updated January 2019

Looking for Health Information Online: How do we how who to trust?
https://tinyurl.com/yb968bvl (guidance from University Hospital Aintree)

  • NICE Evidence Search - provides access to selected and authoritative evidence in health, social care and public health.
  • Cochrane Library - databases of high-quality research evidence.
  • MedLine Plus - a database produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Medscape - U.S. site. A clinical reference features up-to-date, searchable, peer-reviewed medical articles.
  • PubMed - Provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, provides free and simple access to abstracts in healthcare and science-related topics.

The Brain Charity's library at our centre in Liverpool includes many books and other resouces for parents and carers, including the Contact charity's book The Helpful Guide for Families with Disabled Children. There are some books for children and young people too.

You can find more advice and support if you follow some of these links:

Finding support

^ top

Information and guidance

^ top

The Helpful Guide for families with disabled childrenCharities

^ top

Thanks to generous funding from BBC Children in Need, we are providing free dance and art workshops for children and young people, with Physiotherapy through Dance and Occupational Therapy through Art and Craft.

Music-based therapy for people living with dementia

Music can play a vital role in the daily care for people living with dementia - it stirs memories, reduces agitation and creates moments of joyful connection - but sometimes it can be difficult to know how to start! Our series takes participants through useful exercises, practical tips and lively songs to get engaged and activated! Half of the series is made up of Singing workshops, with a focus on Speech & Language Therapy, and the other half is Dance workshops coupled with Physiotherapy

If you sign up to take part in the sessions, you will receive one email per week containing a specialist exercise video and guidance on how to join in safely. And we can accompany you on this journey - during the 12 weeks, you will also have the opportunity to have a consultation with our Speech & Language therapist or Physiotherapist, to speak about any specific issues you, or the person you care for, might be facing.

To sign up to receive this email package, please fill out the form below, and we will be in touch.

Dementia workshops web

If you would like to receive general updates about the work The Brain Charity does, tick: ‘’. 

Sign up to Music Makes Us!

Register now to receive our 12-week dementia video programme. Please tick the box below if you would also like to receive general news and updates from The Brain Charity.

We will never cold call you or sell your data. Click here to read our full privacy policy.

 

If you live in the North West of The UK, and would like more information about the workshops when we launch them again in community settings, please email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Now online!

Huge steps have been taken music-based therapy for people with dementia in recent years. You may have seen programs like ‘Our Dementia Choir’ with Vicky McClure or the Alzheimer’s documentary ‘Alive Inside - a story of Music and Memory’ - which show the amazing effects that music can have on people living with dementia.

Singing dementia workshopWhy does music help? Findings show that musical memory regions in the brain seem to be preserved, even as dementia progresses, and that music activates the brain across different pathways from those of speech. In our music-based dementia therapy workshops in Liverpool we have seen that people can recall lyrics to songs even when they have lost the capacity to speak in full sentences, or that people with no verbal communication at all start to engage in these therapy sessions, responding to the music by nodding along and tapping their feet.

Dementia support at The Brain Charity in Liverpool

It’s not unfair to say that living with dementia can be frightening, isolating and often bewildering. Being in a group of people - for anyone - can sometimes be an anxiety provoking experience. But through our music-based dementia therapy workshops, we see that joining in with the music – with the beat or the lyrics – is infectious, and once participants have joined a session, even the shyest want to return! We have a wonderful team of singers, dancers, professional speech & language therapists and physiotherapists who welcome participants and make sure that they have a safe and enjoyable experience.

In the workshops, we sing and move to fun, up-tempo pop songs and slower melodic tunes. We are happy to take musical suggestions, and our team of session leaders make sure that every taste can be accounted for!

The Brain Charity runs two workshops specifically for people with dementia in Liverpool:

Physiotherapy for dementia through dance

Speech & Language Therapy for dementia through singing

 

dementia project at The Brain Charity 32330We are starting to see first-hand the incredibly beneficial effects. Not only does music have the possibility of triggering memory and transporting people to particular moments in their pasts, it evokes emotion – raising heartbeat and stimulating endorphins and other feel-good chemicals in the body.

According to a 2018 commission on Dementia and Music, there is now “…emerging evidence to suggest that music may help to delay the onset of dementia and improve brain function and information recall”. At The Brain Charity, we look at the positive effects of music on communication and mobility. We are constantly working with our service users, occupational therapists and other experts to find the best exercises - not only to aid people in their dementia journey, but to make the journey as joyful as it can be.

How to book a place

To find out more about The Brain Charity's music-based dementia therapy workshops in Liverpool This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.or call The Brain Charity reception on 0151 298 2999 and ask to speak with Kym. If she's not available, please leave your details and she’ll get back to you as soon as she can.

Thank you to Quilter Cheviot Investment Management for making these music-based dementia therapy workshops in Liverpool possible.Sponsored by Quilter Cheviot

 

See Also:

updated January 2019

Looking for Health Information Online: How do we how who to trust?
https://tinyurl.com/yb968bvl (guidance from University Hospital Aintree)

Occupational Therapy through Art and Craft - now on Zoom

Now watch on YouTube

occupational therapy through art and craft girl with painted hamdsThese free workshops pair the skills of an occupational therapist with a dedicated arts and crafts leader to lead crafts sessions.

Crafting activities assist with dexterity, hand-eye coordination and memory. The workshops are held in a friendly and fun environment and no prior experience is necessary.

All of our experienced workshop leaders are DBS checked and will ensure that the sessions are run in a safe and professional manner.

Each programme runs for 12 weeks in a specific location with hour-long weekly workshops. Parents and carers are welcome to join too.

Previously, each programme of hour-long weekly workshops ran in a specific location, with most taking place in schools in Liverpool.

Due to Covid-19, the project is running via safe, private Zoom video sessions instead.

To book a place or enquire about the workshops contact The Brain Charity on 0151 298 2999 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Supported by B.B.C. Children in Need. Registered charity.The Brain Changer Arts Project

Thanks to generous funding and support from BBC Children in Need, we are providing free dance and art workshops for children and young people, with Physiotherapy through Dance and Occupational Therapy through Art and Craft.

Coronavirus: Liverpool Adult Learning Service have paused all of their classes at the Charity for the time being. Thus includes our English, Maths, Creative Writing, Photography and Computer Classes.

Photography courseIf you'd like to learn to take better pictures, then give our new photography course a try!

Check our online events diary for dates and times.

Most people will be eligible for this course for free if you're on benefits.

To book your place: email our information team or call them free on: 0800 008 6417

Physiotherapy through Dance Workshops for people with dementia

For people living with dementia, keeping active can be increasingly difficult as the condition progresses. If you, or someone you know, experiences dementia, you’ll know that the possibility of a fall can cause real concern.

The Brain Charity’s specialist team of physiotherapists and dancers have developed a set of integrated exercises which are beneficial for agility and mobility, specifically for people living with dementia. By doing these guided exercises frequently, participants can:

  • Maintain balance and flexibility
  • Minimise the risk of trips and falls in the future
  • Retain independence for as long as possible

Dementia support from The Brain Charity in Liverpool now available online

Research shows that participating in music-based therapy activities has positive effects on mood and decreases anxiety. When we get activated by music, different parts of our brain light up. Dancing is so great for our brain health, because we engage multiple regions of the brain while dancing, and learning new dance moves can improve neuroplasticity. And, because dancing involves mental effort and social interaction, it’s the kind of stimulation which can help reduce the risk of dementia.

These free workshops run for 12 weeks at a time, and you are welcome to book if you - or someone you care for - experiences dementia.

At the moment, these workshops run online - please click here for details of how to join.

To enquire about music-based therapy workshops, please email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

See Also:

 

Thank you to Quilter Cheviot Investment Management for making our Physiotherapy through dance workshops for people with dementia possible.Sponsored by Quilter Cheviot

 

Physiotherapy through Dance - now on Zoom

Now watch on YouTube

Physiotherapy through danceThese free workshops pair the skills of a neuro-physiotherapist and a professional dancer to design and deliver dance routines in which the moves are based on wide-ranging and high impact physiotherapy exercises. 

Dancing improves motor control and balance. As physical exercise it can reduce stress and increase serotonin levels; a hormone which is linked to our feelings of wellbeing and happiness.

These workshops aim to improve mobility in a safe and fun environment.

All of our experienced workshop leaders are DBS checked and will ensure that the sessions are run in a safe and professional manner.

Each programme runs for 12 weeks in a specific location with hour-long weekly workshops. Parents and carers are welcome to join too.

Previously, each programme of hour-long weekly workshops ran in a specific location, with most taking place in schools in Liverpool.

Due to Covid-19, the project is running via safe, private Zoom video sessions instead.

To book a place or enquire about the workshops contact The Brain Charity on 0151 298 2999 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Supported by B.B.C. Children in Need. Registered charity.The Brain Changer Arts Project

Thanks to generous funding from BBC Children in Need, we are providing free dance and art workshops for children and young people, with Physiotherapy through Dance and Occupational Therapy through Art and Craft.

If a loved one has a condition which means they are not able to manage their own financial affairs or make decisions for themselves, you can support them by taking on this kind of responsibility for them. If you are granted Power of Attorney, you can act on someone else's behalf. If you are appointed someone's Deputy by the Court of Protection, you can make decisions on their behalf.

Here are some factsheets about the process and how to apply:

You can also apply to become an Appointee to manage DWP payments without Power of Attorney:

At The Brain Charity we can recommend solicitors who can provide specialist legal advice.

Help For Carers

Practical help when you need it most

Living with a neurological condition can throw up endless challenges and they might sometimes leave you feeling like you have a mountain to climb.

Money problems are often at the root of many people’s worries and this can be born out of losing your job or being refused the welfare benefits you need.

Finding the equipment you need, knowing where you can find a specialist lawyer or even just figuring out the best place to go on holiday can be a mine field.

To help you with these and other practical problems we have set up a range of services:

Don't forget, our A-Z of conditions includes information about Autism, Dementia, Fibromyalgia, and Migraine and Cluster Headaches, as well as many other neurological conditions, and where you can find more support if you have one of those conditions.

  • And our website includes a section on Brain Resources with details of online multi-media information and resources to help you keep your brain healthy.

  • Employment is not solely about income. It also provides daily structure, a sense of purpose, and contact with other people – invaluable things for sufferers of disability.
  • With there being more than seven million disabled people of working age in the UK (18% of the working population), businesses cannot afford to ignore this vast pool of talent.
  • Studies in fact show that employers who are disability-smart (not only being aware of the needs of people with disability, but actively recruiting them) and embrace diversity tend to perform better and cultivate stronger, more lasting customer relationships than those who do not.
  • The internet is a fantastic resource for potential jobs nowadays. You can find a number of useful job search engines, such as Universal Jobmatch, Indeed, Reed, CV Library and Monster, amongst others.
  • LinkedIn is a helpful facility for contacting employers, since you can create a profile that explicitly advertises your past employment history, you skills, and what types of job you are searching for.
  • Companies are also increasingly using social media to source new employees, with vacancies advertised on Facebook and Twitter. Be aware that some employers may explore your social media profiles, so review your profile and privacy settings.
  • Don’t have access to the internet? Your local library will be able to assist you.
  • Look out for the ‘disability confident’ symbol on job adverts, also known as the ‘two ticks’ symbol! This symbol demonstrates that the employer is committed to hiring disabled people, and that you will be guaranteed an interview if you meet the basic conditions of the role. More information can be found on Disability Confident, or at your local Jobcentre.

updated January 2019

Looking for Health Information Online: How do we how who to trust?
Looking for Health Information Online: How do we how who to trust?
Download this leaflet https://tinyurl.com/yb968bvl (guidance from University Hospital Aintree)

Support

  • Contact - Charity giving support, advice, information for families with disabled children.
  • NHS Service Search - Search by postcode for local NHS services.
  • Carers UK - The voice of carers - the only carer-led organisation working for carers.
  • Carers Direct - a national information, advice and support service for carers in England, with a helpline.
  • Counselling Directory - a resource for those looking to find a local counsellor, or to get general information on counselling and its uses.
  • Health Talk Online - personal experiences and stories of of health issues and illness.
  • Self Help UK - provides a database of over 1,000 self help organisations, patient support groups and charities across the UK that provide support, guidance and advice to patients, carers and their relatives.

Free NHS-approved apps

Well-being

The importance of finding a specialist solicitor

Over the years we have recognised that many of the people seeking our help are, at one time or another, in need of legal advice and support. It can be extremely hard to find a good quality, reliable solicitor with the specialist expertise needed to support you with a difficult or complex problem.  As a result of this, The Brain Charity decided to assess a number of specialist law firms working within the field in order that we could identify those which we felt would be able to offer our service users a really high quality service.

Qualified and caring legal professionals to support you and your family

Legal Advice at The Brain Charity

We’ve chosen to recommend Potter Rees Dolan Solicitors and Fletchers Solicitors, both leading North West companies with a national reach, and we are confident that they will have the knowledge, skills and customer service levels that you need and should expect. We can assure you that both and Fletchers and Potter Rees Dolan are understanding, friendly and above all excellent within their chosen specialist areas.

Power of Attorney and Court of Protection issues

It is very distressing when a loved one is so unwell that they are not able to manage their own financial affairs or make decisions for themselves anymore. The legal specialists we recommend can guide you through this process step by step explaining how the system works and what needs to be done at each stage. 

legal advice at The Brain CharityMedical Negligence

When we are ill or injured it is the medical profession that we turn to for help. Most of us have the highest levels of trust in their judgement and expertise. However mistakes can, and sometimes do, happen. If you have suffered because of the actions of someone in the medical profession then please seek advice from one of our solicitors to see if they can help.

Serious Injury

If you or a loved one have been injured in a case such as a road traffic accident, a criminal assault or an accident at work it is really important that you seek out specialist legal support to help you make a claim for compensation and for any future rehabilitation costs. This can be a very complex area of the law and so it is important to seek out the right help and to get it in place as soon as possible. Both Potter Rees Dolan and Fletchers offer a no-win no-fee service, and will support you and your family throughout the process.

Our preferred law firms may also be able to help you in a variety of other areas including: Wills and Probate, Cosmetic Negligence, Employment & Family law etc.

We can assure you that both Fletchers Solicitors and Potter Rees Dolan Solicitors are understanding, friendly and above all excellent within their chosen area of expertise. They pride themselves in giving a first class service and will work hard to achieve the best possible outcome for each and every client.

There is no requirement for you to speak to or use the legal specialists we recommend, but please get in touch using the details below if you would like us to help you contact our legal team:

Tel: 0151 556 3376
or   0151 298 2999 
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Fletchers Solicitors

Potter Rees Dolan: Serious Injury Solicitors

 

 

 

 

Having difficulty speaking, and feeling frustrated at losing words, can be a daily experience for people living with dementia. It’s good to know that there are methods of addressing trouble with articulation. 

At The Brain Charity in Liverpool we regularly work with Speech & Language therapists, and have developed a new set of singing-based exercises for people with dementia and carers. By doing these exercises, participants can:

  • Improve swallowing difficulties
  • Strengthen mouth muscles
  • Help breathing problems

Dementia support at The Brain Charity in Liverpool singing

The effects of singing on the brain are, by now, well acknowledged by research. Music activates other parts of the brain than speech, so even when we can’t remember a word, there’s the possibility of singing it! And the positive impact of singing activities can’t be underestimated for people living with dementia. Not only does getting involved in our singing workshops empower participants to use their voices, it provides the opportunity for social engagement and positive neuro-chemical feedback.

These free workshops run for 12 weeks at a time, and you are welcome to book if you - or someone you care for - experiences dementia.

Music Makes Us! Online series

Dementia workshops web

See Also:

 

Thank you to Quilter Cheviot Investment Management for making our Physiotherapy through dance workshops for people with dementia possible.Sponsored by Quilter Cheviot

 

Supported by B.B.C. Children in Need. Registered charity. Thanks to generous funding from BBC Children in Need, The Brain Charity has launched The Brain Changer Arts Project - free workshops that harness the power of the arts to help hundreds of young people with neurological conditions.

The fun, innovative and rewarding sessions, which are currently running as online video classes, provide Physiotherapy through Dance and Occupational Therapy through Art and Craft.

These activities stimulate multiple parts of the brain - dancing improves motor control and balance, can reduce stress and increases serotonin levels while crafting activities assist with dexterity, hand-eye coordination and memory.

The fun workshops are open to children of any age, from any part of the UK and with any neurological condition, as well as their parents and carers.

Physiotherapy through Dance Occupational therapy through Art and Craft

To find out more or suggest a child who might benefit from The Brain Changer Arts Project, fill out the form below and we'll be in touch.

If you would like to also receive general updates about the work The Brain Charity does, please tick the box below.

 

 

Universal Credit (UC) is the new welfare benefit for people of working age who need help with housing and living costs.  Universal Credit is combining six existing welfare benefits into one new one.  This includes replacing jobseeker’s allowance, tax credits, and housing benefit. This new benefit is ‘means-tested’, so your income and savings need to be below a certain amount before you can claim it.

Important: You can only apply for Universal Credit online
www.gov.uk/universal-credit/how-to-claim
If you’re not on the Internet, you can go online at The Brain Charity’s information centre in Liverpool, or at your local library or your local Jobcentre.

If you need help applying, you can call the Universal Credit helpline on 0800 328 5644, Textphone: 0800 328 1344. Monday-Friday, 8.00am - 6.00pm. Calls to these numbers are free.

UC is usually paid monthly, but you should be able to request for it to be paid fortnightly.

You won’t get any payments for five of six weeks after you’ve applied for Universal Credit. The DWP should ask you if you’ll need any help during this time before you get your first payment of UC.

The DWP can give you an advanced payment to tide you over while you’re waiting, but this would just be a loan.  You won’t have to pay any interest on this loan. The DWP will take back re-payments out of your UC every month for a few months, until you have paid back all of the loan.  You have to contact your local Jobcentre to ask for an advanced payment.

Problems applying

It can be difficult just applying for Universal Credit, but you can get benefits advice from The Brain Charity, and from these organisations listed here.

Problems with accessibility

Problems with sanctions

If you're deaf or hard of hearing you'll always get an interpreter at a tribunal. If you can't understand English, you might be able to get an interpreter from your local council.

Coronavirus - useful information:  

Benefits advice

At The Brain Charity we know that many people with a neurological condition can find it difficult to find their way through the welfare benefits system, particularly if they have not had experience of it before. We also know that this can be very difficult if someone has difficulty reading, writing or concentrating for long periods.

 Our Welfare Benefits service is there to help you with the following:

  • Finding out what benefits you are entitled to.
  • Supporting you to apply for those benefits.
  • Helping you to appeal against a decision to reduce or remove your benefits if they have been wrongly taken away.

If you would like help from our welfare benefits service, please call The Brain Charity on 0800 008 6417.  We will take your details and arrange for one of our advisors to speak to you.

Alternatively please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your telephone number and we can call you back to talk about it.

The Brain Charity's Employment Support Service is also on hand to offer help and advice on employment issues, retraining, or finding meaningful alternatives to work.

Useful links

This is a video from the DWP about PIP:

A word cloud of neurological conditions

Understanding Your Brain link: Summary of guidance from the Association of British Neurologists around coronavirus and neurological problems (Brain & Spine Foundation, May 2020)
link: Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine (NHS, December 2020)

A neurological condition is any condition that affects the brain, spinal cord or nervous system. Some neurological conditions appear suddenly, such as brain injury or stroke; some you are born with, such as epilepsy; and others develop over time, such as multiple sclerosis.

Your brain and nervous system control every part of your body, so a problem there can have many serious consequences.

There are 10,000,000 people in the UK living with a neurological condition which has a significant impact on their lives.

Over 1,000,000 people (2% of the UK population) are disabled by their neurological condition.

Approximately 850,000 people in the UK care for someone with a neurological condition.

What is the difference between a neurological condition and a psychological condition?

A neurological condition (or neurological disorder) is a medical problem affecting the brain, the spinal column, or the nervous system.

Neurological conditions are not the same as psychological conditions, which are problems with feelings and emotions. But neurological disorders can cause problems with memory or thinking, or lead to mental health issues like anxiety and depression. For this reason The Brain Charity also offers counselling for those who feel they need it.

Brain scans

The Walton Centre M.R. scannerYour doctor might arrange for you to have a CT scan or an MRI scan (sometimes called fMRI). You will be just have to lie still for a short while on scanning table, while a special gadget uses magnetism to take pictures of your brain. It is not like an X-ray, it doesn't use radiation. Image: The Walton Centre.

More about neurological conditions

If you need help living with your neurological condition, we offer counselling and other emotional support at our centre in Liverpool.

Guidebook for Young Carers (Children who provide care)If you are under 18 and you care for someone then you are a young carer. If you're over 16 you may be entitled to Carer's Allowance. Carers have rights too, including young carers.

ENTWINE Informal Care Online survey on informal care (October 2020)

 

Here are some links about the rights of young carers and the support that is available.

Links

Our library includes information for children and young people, including the Guidebook for Young Carers (Children who provide care).

Help for carers